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Commentary

The daily commentary section provides insights on complex issues in a brief and digestible format. Here you can find analysis of changing economic conditions and original perspectives on how the economy is affecting policy debates.

Government Can't Spend Money to Save Money

Caroline Baum | 05/06/2015

Whenever I hear that nonsensical view that secular stagnation is a story about inadequate aggregate demand, I'm reminded of an economist friend, who puts an immediate end to any discussion of such a concept with his stock response. "Insufficient demand?" What, everybody has everything he or she wants?" I rest my case.

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‘Popular Economics’ Presents Economics For The Everyman

Jared Meyer | 05/05/2015

You’re an economist and you don’t even know it. Oh, and your high school economics teacher didn’t know anything. Many economists have physics envy, causing their obsession with esoteric, complex charts and formulas. John Tamny’s new ‘Popular Economics’ instead explains the miracles of free human action.

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Research

e21 spotlights and directly supports new research that's necessary to develop innovative economic policy solutions for the 21st century. This section highlights in-depth research papers from a range of academics, economists and thinkers across the political spectrum, fostering creative nonpartisan policy solutions to pressing economic concerns.

http://www.economics21.org/files/pdf/e21_04.pdf

Held Hostage: U.S. Ports, Labor Unrest, and the Threat to National Commerce

Diana Furchtgott-Roth | April 26, 2015

America's economic growth depends on ports for a competitive edge in exports and for the flow of imported goods that bolster Americans' paychecks. The costs incurred during slowdowns at U.S. ports, recent and otherwise, highlight the considerable importance of ports to the U.S. economy and the need to reform U.S. port labor law. Indeed, if America is to reap the benefits of the two major new free-trade deals currently under negotiation, the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), U.S. ports must be open for business.

http://www.economics21.org/files/pdf/SOMC%20Policy%20Statement%20March%202015.pdf

Shadow Open Market Committee Statement: Rules-Based Guidelines for Monetary Policy Normalization

SOMC | March 20, 2015

The economy is growing, labor markets have improved dramatically, and inflation is forecast to return to two percent over the intermediate term. However, the Fed still expresses extreme caution about normalizing monetary policy, citing myriad concerns, ranging from sluggish wage growth and low inflation to foreign economic and political risks, which might delay the date at which interest rates finally lift off their zero lower bound. This creates the potential for an erosion of the FOMC’s credibility and suggests the Fed lacks a clear strategy for getting monetary policy back on track.

Morning eBriefs

Each weekday morning, e21 delivers a short email that provides a snap shot of the day's economic news. These eBriefs include e21 exclusive commentaries and the latest market news and updates from Washington.

Multimedia

What Is Next for the Fed?

Caroline Baum and Marvin Goodfriend discuss the Shadow Open Market Committee's core principles and monetary policy.

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Why Your Plan Was Cancelled: Health Insurance and the Affordable Care Act

There's a bizarre reason why millions of Americans saw their health plans cancelled in 2013 and, as explained in a new video featuring Robert Graboyes of the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, millions more will lose their plans in years to come. 

Insurance coverage for Americans will remain in permanent turmoil because the Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires that all plans fit within cookie-cutter designs called "metallic tiers." (The tiers—bronze, silver, gold, and platinum—refer to the percentage of medical expenses a particular plan pays.) The video also explains that families may have to switch plans repeatedly because, as circumstances change, a plan that fits within a tier one year may not fit in any tier in a later year.

Please see Dr. Graboyes’ op-ed on this issue (Under Obamacare, Americans Will Continue to Lose Coverage) http://www.usnews.com/opinion/economic-intelligence/2014/09/22/under-obamacare-americans-will-continue-to-lose-coverage

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