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Commentary

  • New York Times Explains Gender Wage Gap

    Feminists complain that women are victims of discrimination who earn 78 cents on a man’s dollar. This misleading figure compares earnings of full-time working women to those of men, irrespective of type of job or time in the workforce. But the story of the Geller Law Group shows that women’s choices can result in lower pay. 

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  • Rubio Already Spearheading Tax Reform

    But a president's past experience does not determine the extent of issues he can address as president.  To achieve as president, what is needed is governing experience, vision, and first-rate personnel. Presidents John F. Kennedy, Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush had no experience in federal tax legislation, yet each president signed major tax reform into law.

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  • Trade Agreement Will Accomplish Nothing if Ports Aren’t Open

    Currently, employment at ports is governed by the National Labor Relations Act, while employment at airlines and railroads is overseen by the Railway Labor Act. Labor disruptions at the ports are allowed under the NLRA, but not under the RLA without government permission after a long period of mediation. It’s time to give ports the same protections as railroads and airlines.

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  • To Make Social Security Disability Insurance Fairer and Sustainable, Eliminate t

    Factoring societal and technological advances into the disability determinations process will end Disability Insurance’s unsustainable expansion and restore fairness to our nation’s critical moral endeavor.

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  • America Can Avoid “Japanese-Style” Deflation

    Persistently low inflation has led some to suggest that the United States may have entered a period of long-run economic stagnation. Support for the most pessimistic forecasts along these lines often is based on the case of Japan, where the economy’s deflationary slump is about to enter its third decade. Japanese data illustrate an important lesson for how the United States can avoid a similar deflationary outcome.

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  • Problems With Piketty

    In every era, government itself has been and remains the primary source (crime being the other) of unjust negative-sum actions, yet Piketty wants to vastly increase the power of government to control the distribution of wealth. This is Capital’s message. I do not buy it. 

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  • New Purple Line Study Fails Economics 101

    The new Purple Line study has no economically reliable content. It uses the wrong economic concepts of measuring the value of a public project.  It uses survey rather than actual data.  Its survey technique is not representative of Maryland’s population.  The conclusions it reaches defy economic logic.  The state of Maryland and the federal government cannot reasonable rely on this study for any purpose.

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  • Costs of Merging Social Security Retirement and Disability Funds

    Merging the OASI and DI trust funds would be a significant departure from lawmakers’ previous promises that the establishment of disability benefits within Social Security would not reduce the funds available for paying retirement benefits. It could also have the adverse effects of further delaying necessary financial repairs, worsening operational opacity and weakening commitment to the self-financing principle. 

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  • Time to Lift the Ban on Crude Oil Exports

    This week Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee Chairman Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) said she would push this year for legislation to end the United States’ export ban on crude oil. “We shouldn’t lift sanctions on Iranian oil while keeping sanctions on American oil,” she said. “It makes no sense.” Murkowski is correct—repealing the ban is long overdue.

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  • Does the U.S. Have Less Economic Mobility? Part 2

    Nothing in the Corak, Linduist, and Mazumder paper suggests that U.S. and Swedish levels of mobility differ meaningfully from each other. That still leaves the 2006 paper by Jantti and his coauthors, which found that the U.S. had lower relative mobility—at least for sons starting out at the bottom—than Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland, and the U.K. I’ll explain why this paper’s conclusion is also incorrect and explore some additional research comparing the U.S. to other countries in my final installment.

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